nez

Aimee Nezhukumatathil

Acclaimed Poet, Writer & Teacher

Readings & Lecture Topics

  • Landscapes & Light : Poetry and the Natural World


“Nezhukumatathil speaks with resonance and fierceness…”-Publishers Weekly

“Aimee Nezhukumatathil is able to handle serious subjects with the lightest of touches. Her edgy humor and keen eye keep her poems buoyant and fresh.” -Billy Collins

“Aimee Nezhukumatathil’s poems are as ripe, funny, and fresh as a precious friendship. They’re the fullness of days, deliciously woven of heart and verve….Poems like these revive our souls.” -Naomi Shihab Nye 

Born to a Filipino mother and Malayali Indian father, Aimee Nezhukumatathil (neh-ZOO / koo-mah / tah-TILL) is the author of three books of poetry: Lucky Fish (2011), winner of the Hoffer Grand Prize for Prose and Independent Books; At the Drive-In Volcano (2007); and Miracle Fruit (2003), all on Tupelo PressLucky Fish won the gold medal in Poetry for the Independent Publishers Book Awards and was featured in the New York Times and on the PBS NewsHour ArtsBeat. Poems from this collection were also awarded an NEA Fellowship in poetry, the Glenna Luschia Prize from Prairie Schooner, and the Angoff Award from The Literary Review for the best poems appearing that volume year. At the Drive-In Volcano was named winner of the Balcones Prize, which honors an outstanding collection published the previous year. Her first collection of poetry, Miracle Fruit, was selected by Gregory Orr for the Tupelo Press Prize and was the winner of ForeWord Magazine’s Book of the Year Award in poetry, the Global Filipino Literary Award. Other awards for her writing include the Pushcart Prize, a poetry fellowship to the Wisconsin Institute for Creative Writing, the Boatwright Prize from Shenandoah, and the Richard Hugo Prize from Poetry Northwest.

Poems and essays have appeared in American Poetry Review, Quarterly West, New England Review, Ploughshares, FIELD, Antioch Review, Prairie Schooner, Slate, Virginia Quarterly Review, The Southern Review, and Tin House. Poems and essays have been widely anthologized in such venues as Billy Collins’ second edition of Random House’s Poetry 180: A Poem a Day and Language for a New Century: Contemporary Asian American Poetry from W.W. Norton. A number of essays and poems have also been published in several high school AP English textbooks and college textbooks.

Nezhukumatathil is a Professor of English at State University of New York-Fredonia where she was awarded the Chancellor’s Medal of Excellence and named the campus-wide Hagan Young Scholar. She has twice served as a faculty member for the Kundiman Asian American Poetry Retreat. Her books are widely adopted for high schools, colleges, and universities as part of contemporary poetry, women’s studies, and Asian-American literature classes; and she has been a featured reader at over a hundred venues all over the world-from places as varied as the John Adams Institute in Amsterdam, to being a headliner for the Dodge Poetry Festival, to UC-Berkeley, NYU, and reading for both the Poetry Society of America and The Academy of American Poets. She lives in western New York with her husband and two young sons.

Aimee Nezhukumatathil website


Aimee Nezhukumatathil is the author of three books of poetry: Lucky Fish, winner of the Hoffer Grand Prize for Prose and Independent Books; At the Drive-In Volcano; and Miracle Fruit. Poems and essays have appeared in American Poetry Review, Quarterly West, New England Review, Ploughshares, FIELD, Antioch Review, Prairie Schooner, Slate, Virginia Quarterly Review, The Southern Review, and Tin House. She has been awarded an NEA Fellowship in poetry, the Glenna Luschia Prize from Prairie Schooner, and the Angoff Award from The Literary Review.


LUCKY FISH (Poetry, 2011)
Lucky Fish travels along a lush current – a confluence of leaping vocabulary and startling formal variety, with upwelling gratitude at its source: for love, motherhood, “new hope,”and the fluid and rich possibilities of words themselves. With an exuberant appetite for “my morning song, my scurry-step, my dew,”anchored in complicated human situations, this astounding young poet’s third collection of poems is her strongest yet.

AT THE DRIVE-IN VOLCANO (Poetry, 2007)
In At the Drive-In Volcano Aimee Nezhukumatathil examines the full circle journey of desire; loss; and, ultimately; an exuberant love-traveling around a world brimming with wild and delicious offerings such as iced waterfalls, jackfruit, and pistol shrimp. From the tropical landscapes of the Caribbean, India, and the Philippines to the deep winters of western New York and mild autumns of Ohio, the natural world Nezhukumatathil describes is dark but also lovely-so full of enchantment and magic. Here, worms glow in the dark, lizards speak, the most delicious soup in the world turns out to be deadly, and a woman eats soil as if it were candy. Her trademark charm, verve and wit remain elemental and a delight to behold, even in the face of a crumbling relationship. These poems confront delicate subjects of love and loss with an exacting exuberance and elegance not hardly seen in a writer so young.

MIRACLE FRUIT (Poetry, 2003)
As three worlds collide, a mother’s Philippines, a father’s India, and the poet’s contemporary America, the resulting impressions are chronicled in this collection of incisive and penetrating verse. The writer weaves her words carefully into wise and affecting embroidery that celebrates the senses while remaining down-to-earth and genuine.


ECLIPSE
for Pascal

She’s been warned not to sleep with moonlight
on her face or she will be taken from herhouse.

She wears eel-skin to protect herself. She tilts
her face to the night sky when no one islooking.
During the eclipse, eels bubble in their dark

and secret caves. Toads frenzy in pastures
just outside of town, surrounding the dumbcows

in a wet mess of croak and sizzle. Years later,
she would touch the hand of a green-eyed man
by the weird light. Because of him, she plants
a moon garden: freesia, snowdrops, fotherfilla,
bugbane. She is a runner-bean, stretching best

and brilliant in this light. Their child ismoon-faced.
She is crazy about them. She is lunatic. She
is taken. She is a hymn book flipped open.

-from Lucky Fish

WHEN WEAVER ANTS CUT (A VALENTINE)

I love the dance of every one helping.
Each ant chews and chews a bit of juicyleaf
and stands on his back four legs to raise
the leaf shape up high above his head.
The congo line-a honey shimmer of bodies
rushing to bring the cut leaf home. For twelve
years, the ruler of Garwara, India was a jackal.
All the laughing in that town cannot
compare to what you have brought
into my home: a filament of light inside
a dark jellyfish bell. It’s this dance of ants
down a tree, around a stubborn frog-I want
to dance with you-how brave the line,
how tiny the step, a hundred green valentines.

-from At the Drive-In Volcano

Content for the tab Interviews & Articles